*CERATI: FUERZA NATURAL (Documentary)

The opening lyrics to the first track of Gustavo Cerati’s 2010 album Fuerza Natural evoke some profound emotions, and they always manage to put me in a reflective mood. Those opening lyrics are haunting….

Puedo equivocarme, Tengo todo por delante Y nunca me senti tan bien, Viajo sin moverme de aqui….

Rock en Español has always been a critical component of my musical DNA, and within that DNA, Gustavo Cerati’s music has played a crucial role in shaping saïd DNA. This is why I was beyond excited when I heard that a documentary about the making of Fuerza Natural was available.

We are transported back to the recording sessions of the Fuerza Natural album, which became Cerati’s final studio album—filmed by Leonardo Fresco, a musician who collaborated with Cerati many times and played keyboards on Fuerza Natural. This documentary is a black and white intimate look at Gustavo Cerati’s recording and creative process. And although this documentary piece is only 15 minutes long, it still manages to capture some remarkable images and moments.

We get to see some cool stuff, like the recording of the song Cactus (Track 8), as Cerati plays the acoustic guitar himself. We get a quick peek at the handwritten lyrics and music notes for He visto a Lucy (Track 13). We see some pretty neat, old-school special effects made in-studio.

He seemed deeply involved in the music-making process. We get to see him carefully listening and fine-tuning every single piece of musical notes, making adjustments, changes, and offering constant feedback to his studio band. There is a moment when we see Cerati providing input on exactly how he wanted the bass to sound like….. that was a pretty cool thing to see.

I also notice his constant chain-smoking, which might have contributed to the respiratory issues that he developed after suffering the stroke. It is pretty surreal watching him happy, full of life, creating magic in the recording studio, and then barely a year later, he would fall into a coma and lay on a hospital bed for four years until he died in 2014.

This short documentary piece is a must-watch for all Soda Stereo and Gustavo Cerati fans; for 15 minutes, we get to pretend that we are there with him, and he still is here with us.

*RIP PAU DONES: JARABE DE PALO — Tragas O Escupes (Album Recap)

I was bummed beyond belief to hear about the recent passing of Pau Dones, the leader and frontman of Jarabe de Palo.

I first discovered Jarabe de Palo in the summer of 1999; I was dating a girl who at the time was much more knowledgable about emerging Rock en Español bands than me. She gave me a list of bands to look out for, and Jarabe de Palo was on the list. Our relationship didn’t last long, but I think the incredible music she exposed me to was the highlight of our relationship.

In those days, right after receiving my weekly paycheck from my minimum wage job, I would go on an obsessive-compulsive music buying spree. Every single week, I would make pit stops at multiple music stores throughout my city and end up spending a big chunk of my paycheck on music….. I can still clearly remember like it was yesterday when I purchased my first Jarabe de Palo CD, way back in the summer of 1999 — it was the album “DEPENDE” (1998), and it feels somewhat ironic that this past summer of 2019 marked 20 years since I bought their first album.

It quickly became one of my favorite albums of that year, and still today, it is one of my favorite Rock en Español albums ever. The whole album is pure magic, and it even includes a duet with Celia Cruz on the final track. Pau’s music was a fusion of rock, pop, flamenco-rock, and all the great Latin sounds that make Rock en Español such a fantastic genre. DEPENDE has aged nicely over the years, and it still sounds relevant today as much as it did 20 years ago — I would put DEPENDE in my top 20 Rock en Español albums of all time for sure.

Tragas o Escupes was released at the end of May on all streaming platforms, which caught me by complete surprise because I heard that the album was supposed to drop in September of this year. But it came out nearly 4 months ahead of schedule, and along with the album, Pau attached a press release thanking all of his fans and people who have supported him throughout his career. Sadly, Pau Dones passed away 12 days after the release of Tragas o Escupes; his final studio album.

Now, it makes complete sense to me why the album was released a few months earlier and why Pau’s letter was also attached to the album’s release. The whole thing reminds me of David Bowie’s Darkstar album being released a few days before his passing.

When news of Pau’s cancer diagnosis became public, there was an overwhelming outpouring of love that humbled Pau. As I read the letter he wrote to his fans, it becomes clear to me that perhaps he wanted to take this final opportunity to acknowledge and thank all those strangers who, in a way, were never really strangers to him…. Jarabe de Palo’s music brought us close to Pau and will continue to bring us closer….. Even long after he is gone from our physical realm.

The promotional first single, “Eso Que Tu Me Das,” sounds like a direct farewell to all his fans and loved ones — A farewell in the typical Jarabe de Palo manner.

With this album, Pau manages to turn the sad energy of his passing into a positive one — as you listen to the whole album, you cannot help but realize how at peace with his life he truly was. His musical approach was always about positivity and joy. The type of music that found the light within all the darkness.

I am glad that I had the chance to watch him perform live at the Howard Theatre in Washington DC, back in 2015. It was an excellent experience that I will cherish forever.

Jarabe De Palo – Live at the Howard Theatre (Washington DC, 2015)

As I listened to this TRAGAS O ESCUPES album in its entirety, it becomes such a unique and surreal listening experience to me; all the lyrics have profound meaning. It is like you are listening to a manifesto of a life that was lived fully, and now it seemed ready to come to an end — especially as I listen to the whole album within the context of his passing embedded in my consciousness.

Buen Viaje Pau….Thanks for the music.

*LIAM GALLAGHER — WHY ME WHY NOT (Album Recap)

I have always maintained that the closest thing my generation had to the Beatles was Oasis. I spent most of the 90s listening to bands like Oasis, Foo Fighters, U2, The Verve — you know, bands with guts and swagger. Those bands resonated deeply with me during my late teens to early 20s…..Hell, they still resonate with me today as I reach middle age.

I was pumped beyond belief when Liam Gallagher’s AS YOU WERE came out in 2017. It was a straightforward, kick-ass, in your face type of album. Furthermore, and most importantly, it was a guitar-based album, which is the type of albums that I usually prefer to listen to. I appreciate some experimentation here and there from some of my favorites bands. Still, certain things work just fine the way they are, and consistency is precisely what Liam Gallagher always delivers with his records.

Track 4: Paper Crown and track 5: For What is Worth are on constant replay in my daily playlist. Full disclosure; I do not own AS YOU WERE on vinyl yet. I bought the digital deluxe iTunes version when it came out…. but the LP is on top of my future purchases list.

WHY ME WHY NOT takes things to another level. This album rocks and kicks major ass. Liam is the personification of Rocknroll, and this album is so far his best work since Oasis.

Look, I am a nostalgic person by nature, and I would love nothing more than an Oasis reunion. However, this album is the closest thing to the vibe and sound of what an Oasis album should feel like. Noel Gallagher’s 2015, Chasing Yesterday, had a bit of an Oasis vibe to it, and it was a damn good album…. I think it would have made a perfect Oasis record.

I will not go on a track-by-track breakdown because every single track on this record rocks. However, there is a particularly interesting song, One of Us (Track 2). Liam has publicly stated that it is an “olive branch” to Noel, and most likely, his final reconciliation attempt.

Track 3, ONCE is ageless. I fucking love this song.

Liam has tapped into something unique here as a solo act; His live concerts are sold-out shows, and his albums are on top of the charts. All of his music videos are pretty cool, plus, there is an MTV Unplugged that just came out, which I already bought on iTunes, and I just ordered the LP version. The next thing for me on my wish list is to catch a live concert next time he comes through NYC.

*BUNBURY: POSIBLE (Album Recap)

It has been three long-ass years since the release of the highly successful Expectativas (2017), and Bunbury is finally delivering another excellent studio album. It comes out at a crucial moment during this global pandemic, where there is this collective hunger for light and positivity—a need for quality in music, films, and art. And POSIBLE arrives at the perfect moment to soothe our souls.

Bunbury has been consistently making some of the most profound and well-crafted albums of the last 20 years, so the expectations are always high when it comes to his work. Hell, in a world where Live albums are a rarity, Bunbury has released two of the most compelling “live” recordings of recent history; Bunbury: MTV Unplugged (2015) and Bunbury: California Live (2019). Both albums are excellent musical productions.

However, Posible (2020) feels more like an experimental album than previous Bunbury albums. There is a straightforward electronic-rock approach to it, full of lyrics that scrutinize certain aspects of his personal life. A more brooding, soul searching, and more personal sounding album. Where the possibilities of living multiple and parallel lives within a singular existence is a central theme here, I could not help but sense a cinematic vibe throughout this album, with a deep metaphysical sensitivity.

There are tons of David Lynch-inspired musical imagery that come across as you listen to this album, especially when you watch the music videos attached to this album. Most Notably, the Video for “Deseos de usar y tirar,” which is beautifully directed by frequent Bunbury collaborator and highly regarded visual artist Jose Girl (she directed all three videos for this album).

This Video has a clear-cut David Lynch influence, which features Sherilyn Fenn (Twin Peaks) and trans woman artist Jessica Hogan.

This Video for “Cualquiera en su sano juicio (se habría vuelto loco por ti)” is also full of David Lynch vibes. I heard Bunbury was influenced to practice transcendental meditation after hearing about Lynch’s creative process, which explains the connection.

I have been playing this album on heavy rotation, and I really think that as time passes by, it will age very nicely amongst some of the very best albums in the entire Bunbury discography.

Electro-rock is a sound that I have always appreciated when done right. U2’s Achtung Baby (1991) comes immediately to mind. And this album is right up there in terms of quality. A mix of elegant sounding lyrics and bold experimentations. POSIBLE is another phenomenal achievement for a remarkable artist.

WARNER MUSIC SPAIN (2020)

*MOVIE RECAP: ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD

One of the strange benefits of this lockdown is that I finally have time to catch up with a bunch of movies that I missed in theaters and didn’t have time to watch once they became available to stream.

It’s really nice not having to do anything but work on my screenwriting and catch up on movies and TV shows.

Having said that, All The Money In The World has been on my “To Watch List” for over two years….. I can’t believe it took me this long to watch it.

I am a huge fan and admirer of Ridley Scott as a filmmaker — He has made some of the most fascinating and brilliant films of the last 45 years. And I always get excited whenever I see his name involved in a project.

About a month away from this movie’s release date, Ridley Scott announced that he would recast Kevin Spacey’s role and reshoot all of his scenes entirely with Christopher Plummer as his replacement. It was a bold but necessary move by Scott.

Christopher Plummer is formidable in all his scenes, which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. You have to pay close attention to notice any signs of adjustments to the original Spacey scenes.

Plummer plays the infamous J. Paul Getty, founder of the Getty Oil Company. From around the 1950s through his eventual death in 1976, Getty was considered to be the wealthiest man in the world.

This film is set in 1973 and centered around the kidnapping of Getty’s teenage grandson in Italy and the initial $17 million ransom demanded by the kidnappers.

Getty refuses to pay the kidnappers, insisting that if he paid for the ransom, then his other 14 grandkids could also be kidnapped and held for ransom. The kid’s mother, Gail (Michelle Williams), who at the time of the kidnapping is already divorced from John Paul Getty Jr. (Andrew Buchan). Gail is trying to raise the ransom money on her own — and the only thing J. Paul Getty can offer as help is to appoint his personal fixer Fletcher Chase (Mark Wahlberg), to negotiate with the kidnappers.

Based on the 1995 book by John PearsonPainfully Rich: the Outrageous Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Heirs of J. Paul Getty. And even though the film is based on actual events, many liberties are being taken here, especially on a shootout scene between the mobsters involved in the kidnapping and the Italian police, which never took place.

There are a couple of scenes that further exemplify how blatantly cheap J. Paul Getty was, but one particular scene stands out, which showed how he had a payphone installed in his mansion for visitors to make phone calls, while his butler is ready to provide loose change in case someone needs coins to make a call.

All the Money in the World is an entertaining film, with outstanding performances by Plummer and Williams, whose combative relationship is at the very center of this story. I am curious whether there will be a director’s cut available at some point — I would love to watch it.

Three out of Five Popcorn Bags 🍿🍿🍿

All the Money in the World (2017).